Brother of victim reacts as US soldier admits killing 16 Afghans, but escapes death penalty



(6 Jun 2013)
AP TELEVISION
Kandahar – 6 June 2013
1. Wide of Baraan Noorzia, whose relatives were victims of shooting
2. Close of Noorzia drinking from cup
3. Cutaway of Noorzia’s hands
4. SOUNDBITE: (Pashto) Baraan Noorzia, relative of shooting victims:
“A person who killed 16 and wounded six has been given such leniency by the Americans and has not been given the death penalty, it does not satisfy us and we don’t accept it.”
5. Close of Noorzia
6. SOUNDBITE: (Pashto) Baraan Noorzia, relative of shooting victims:
“What kind of law do they (Americans) have? They can go to anywhere in the world, to Afghanistan killing Muslims, entering the house at night, abusing the elders and female members of the families, and in that case there is no law, but on the other hand they have a law that gives leniency and not the death penalty to someone who deserves it.”
7. Various of Noorzia praying
DVIDS (US DEFENCE DEPARTMENT VIDEO AND IMAGES)
FILE: Fort Irwin, California – 23 August 2011
8. STILL of US Army Staff Sergeant Robert Bales, who is accused of killing 16 Afghan villagers in a shooting incident, seen during training exercise shaking hands with another soldier, who is unknown
DVIDS (US DEFENCE DEPARTMENT VIDEO AND IMAGES)
FILE: Fort Irwin, California – 23 August 2011
9. STILL of Bales
AP TELEVISION
FILE: Balandi, Afghanistan – 11 March 2012
10. Wide of men brushing through ashes and debris in aftermath of shooting incident
11. Close of yellow evidence markers and shell casings on ground
12. Wide of crowd of villagers
13. Mid of villagers in back of truck, with blankets purportedly covering dead bodies
14. Truck, with what appears to be bodies of victims covered in blankets in the back, driving away
STORYLINE
The brother of an Afghan man killed in an alleged shooting rampage has said he is outraged that the accused, US Army Staff Sergeant Robert Bales will not face the death penalty.
Bales pleaded guilty to murder on Wednesday, ensuring that the harshest sentence he will receive is life in prison.
Prosecutors say Bales slipped away from his base in Kandahar Province before dawn on March 11, 2012.
Armed with a 9mm pistol and an M-4 rifle equipped with a grenade launcher, he attacked a village of mud-walled compounds called Alkozai, then returned and woke up a fellow soldier to tell him about it.
The soldier didn’t believe Bales and went back to sleep. Bales then left to attack a second village known as Najiban.
“A person who killed 16 and wounded six has been given such leniency by the Americans and has not been given the death penalty, it does not satisfy us and we don’t accept it,” said Baraan Noorzia on Thursday, whose brother was a victim of the shooting.
“What kind of law do they (Americans) have? They can go to anywhere in the world, to Afghanistan killing Muslims, entering the house at night, abusing the elders and female members of the families, and in that case there is no law, but on the other hand they have a law that gives leniency and not the death penalty to someone who deserves it,” added Noorzia.
Wednesday’s proceedings marked the first time that 39-year-old Bales provided a public account of the massacre.
Bales said he decided to kill everyone after struggling with one of the women.
The deaths raised questions about the frequency of combat deployments and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder.
Until the attacks, Bales – serving his fourth deployment, had a good, if undistinguished, military record in a decade-long career.
He suffered from PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder) and a traumatic brain injury, his lawyers say.

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