carbon catching: propagate your own herbs



Grow with me! Howdy, I’m Nico, a sociology undergrad student at Concordia University passionate about climate mitigation simultaneous with social inclusion/justice. I wanna share my plant knowledge with you! Today’s video, edited by Mary Kroitor, will teach you how to carbon catch by water propagating mint (and other herb plants) from stem cuttings found in the grocery store, gifted from a friend with an established plant, or snipped from a plant found on public property 😉

as many of us already know, climate change is mostly the responsibility of the (white supremacist, patriarchal, heteronormative and cisgender) capitalist industry as private consumers contribute a fraction of carbon global emissions, though, that does not mean we can not individually aid in climate mitigation. By having houseplants and growing self-sustaining indoor/outdoor gardens, you are learning indigenous plant literacy and divesting in the wasteful western industrial agriculture machine (which is the second leading cause of greenhouse gas emissions, more destructive than the global transport sector). Additionally, there is evidence co-existing with plants can be helpful for your mental health such as anxiety, depression, and even post-traumatic stress disorder.

Fruits and veggies at grocery stores often times have been genetically modified to be seedless, meaning consumers cannot save seeds/scraps to then cultivate their own produce. Herbs on the other hand are luckily challenging to be kept privatized, while they do not often display viable flowers/seeds, their stems contain “nodes” which can be viewed in a similar sense; both seeds and nodes contain genetic material necessary to reproduce. Urban gardening and local agriculture cultivation is an act of protest against the oppressive capitalist system and turns to indigenous ways of sustainable food production. Let’s revolutionize, baby!

Instagram: @mullet__daddy @moon.mend and check out the lovely non-profit @greenhoundcanada for more plant propagation tips www.greenhoundcanada.org

Source: Youtube