CDC "Shielding Approach" – Forced Removal of American Citizens From Home and Family



“Once they don’t kill you, you start to think they’re nice. They get nicer every day that they don’t kill you”
(Patty Hearst)

CDC Plans To Implement the Shielding Approach – Forced Removal of Citizens From Their Homes.
Does anyone care? In case someone does, read about it here

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/global-covid-19/shielding-approach-humanitarian.html#r1

from the CDC website:

Interim Operational Considerations for Implementing the Shielding Approach to Prevent COVID-19 Infections in Humanitarian Settings

This document presents considerations from the perspective of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC) for implementing the shielding approach in humanitarian settings as outlined in guidance documents focused on camps, displaced populations and low-resource settings.1,2 This approach has never been documented and has raised questions and concerns among humanitarian partners who support response activities in these settings. The purpose of this document is to highlight potential implementation challenges of the shielding approach from CDC’s perspective and guide thinking around implementation in the absence of empirical data. Considerations are based on current evidence known about the transmission and severity of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and may need to be revised as more information becomes available. Please check the CDC website periodically for updates.

What is the Shielding Approach1?
The shielding approach aims to reduce the number of severe COVID-19 cases by limiting contact between individuals at higher risk of developing severe disease (“high-risk”) and the general population (“low-risk”). High-risk individuals would be temporarily relocated to safe or “green zones” established at the household, neighborhood, camp/sector or community level depending on the context and setting.1,2 They would have minimal contact with family members and other low-risk residents.

Current evidence indicates that older adults and people of any age who have serious underlying medical conditions are at higher risk for severe illness from COVID-19.3 In most humanitarian settings, older population groups make up a small percentage of the total population.4,5 For this reason, the shielding approach suggests physically separating high-risk individuals from the general population to prioritize the use of the limited available resources and avoid implementing long-term containment measures among the general population.

In theory, shielding may serve its objective to protect high-risk populations from disease and death. However, implementation of the approach necessitates strict adherence1,6,7, to protocol. Inadvertent introduction of the virus into a green zone may result in rapid transmission among the most vulnerable populations the approach is trying to protect.

M I L G R A M E X P E R I M E N T

The Milgram experiment(s) on obedience to authority figures was a series of social psychology experiments conducted by Yale University psychologist Stanley Milgram. Milgram devised his psychological study to explain the psychology of genocide. The experiment found, unexpectedly, that a very high proportion of subjects would fully obey the instructions, albeit reluctantly.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Milgram_experiment

S T O C K H O L M S Y N D R O M E

The Stockholm syndrome refers to the paradoxical
development of reciprocal positive feelings between
hostages and their captors…

Four conditions form the basis for the formation of
the Stockholm syndrome:
(i) perceived threat to one’s
physical or psychological survival at the hands of an
abuser(s);
(ii) perceived small kindnesses from the
abuser to the victim;
(iii) isolation from perspectives
other than those of the abuser; and
(iv) the inescapability
of the situation.

Anxiety and fear have been essential to survival.
Further, anxiety disorder subtypes are associated
with symptoms that make sense from a survival
perspective

Different mammals manifest different appeasement
behaviours. Many reduce their apparent size, signalling ‘no threat’.

Humans cower, bow, kneel, prostrate themselves…

Appeasement is associated with the emotions fear
and shame.

Fear motivates defense; shame facially and otherwise signals ‘no threat’. Shame is an emotion that is so uncomfortable that dissociation is often involved

Excerpts from:
Traumatic entrapment, appeasement and complex
post-traumatic stress disorder: evolutionary
perspectives of hostage reactions, domestic abuse
and the Stockholm syndrome

by Chris Cantor, John Price

original beat by steady delta

#cdc #quarantine #MilgramExperiment #stockholmsyndrome

Source: Youtube