Do murderers get PTSD?



Hi all! This video talks about whether murderers (of different forms) could show increased or decreased post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms. Does having an appetite for violence/showing murder remorse affect this? Hope you enjoy!

Website: avamason.com
Proofreading/collaborations: neuropsych@avamason.com
Music creds- Jayan Patel

00:00 Intro
00:43 What is a murderer?
1:16 Appetite for violence= dec PTSD
04:47 What is moral injury?
06:19 Perpetrator induced traumatic stress
08:23 Summary

References
Currier et al. (2015). How do morally injurious events occur? A qualitative analysis of perspectives of Veterans with PTSD. Traumatology, 21, 106–116.

Ehlers et al. (2000). A cognitive model of posttraumatic stress disorder. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 38, 319–345.

Evans et al.  (2007). Intrusive memories and ruminations related to violent crime among young offenders: phenomenological characteristics. Journal of Traumatic Stress, 20, 183–196

Litz et al.  (2009). Moral injury and moral repair in war veterans: a preliminary model and intervention strategy. Clinical Psychology Review, 29, 695–706.

MacNair, R. (2002). Perpetration-induced traumatic stress: The psychological consequences of killing. Greenwood Publishing Group.

MacNair, R. M. (2002). Perpetration-induced traumatic stress in combat veterans. Peace and Conflict: Journal of Peace Psychology, 8(1), 63-72.

MacNair, R. M. (2015). Causing trauma as a form of trauma. Peace and Conflict: Journal of Peace Psychology, 21(3), 313

Weierstall et al. (2011). The thrill of being violent as an antidote to posttraumatic stress disorder in Rwandese genocide perpetrators. European journal of psychotraumatology, 2(1), 6345.

Whiting, T. L., & Marion, C. R. (2011). Perpetration-induced traumatic stress—A risk for veterinarians involved in the destruction of healthy animals. The Canadian Veterinary Journal, 52(7), 794.

Williamson et al.(2018). Occupational moral injury and mental health: systematic review and meta-analysis. British Journal of Psychiatry, 212, 339–346.

Source: Youtube