One Month On ZOLOFT!!! (UPDATE)



Another update on my Zoloft journey! Hope you enjoy!!!

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Sertraline, sold under the trade name Zoloft among others, is an antidepressant of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) class.[8] It is used to treat major depressive disorder, obsessive–compulsive disorder, panic disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, premenstrual dysphoric disorder, and social anxiety disorder.[8] Sertraline is taken by mouth.[8]

Common side effects include diarrhea, sexual dysfunction, and troubles with sleep.[8] Serious side effects include an increased risk of suicide in those less than 25 years old and serotonin syndrome.[8] It is unclear whether use during pregnancy or breastfeeding is safe.[9] It should not be used together with MAO inhibitor medication.[8] Sertraline is believed to work by increasing serotonin effects in the brain.[8]

Sertraline was approved for medical use in the United States in 1991 and initially sold by Pfizer.[8] It is currently available as a generic medication.[8] In the United States, the wholesale cost is about 1.50 USD per month as of 2018.[10] In 2016, it was the most prescribed psychiatric medication in the United States,[11] with over 37 million prescriptions.

Treatment Options Depression Zoloft
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Zoloft
Generic Name: sertraline (SER tra leen)
Brand Names: Zoloft

Medically reviewed by Sophia Entringer, PharmD Last updated on Jan 2, 2019.

OverviewSide EffectsDosageProfessionalTipsInteractionsMore
What is Zoloft?

Zoloft (sertraline) is an antidepressant belonging to a group of drugs called selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). Sertraline affects chemicals in the brain that may be unbalanced in people with depression, panic, anxiety, or obsessive-compulsive symptoms.

Zoloft is used to treat depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, panic disorder, anxiety disorders, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD).

Zoloft may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Important information
You should not use Zoloft if you also take pimozide, or if you are being treated with methylene blue injection.

Do not use Zoloft if you have used an MAO inhibitor in the past 14 days, such as isocarboxazid, linezolid, methylene blue injection, phenelzine, rasagiline, selegiline, or tranylcypromine.

Some young people have thoughts about suicide when first taking an antidepressant. Stay alert to changes in your mood or symptoms. Report any new or worsening symptoms to your doctor.

Seek medical attention right away if you have symptoms of serotonin syndrome, such as: agitation, hallucinations, fever, sweating, shivering, fast heart rate, muscle stiffness, twitching, loss of coordination, nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea.

Before taking this medicine
You should not use Zoloft if you are allergic to sertraline, or if you also take pimozide. Do not use the liquid form of Zoloft if you are taking disulfiram (Antabuse) or you could have a severe reaction to the disulfiram.

Do not take Zoloft within 14 days before or 14 days after you take an MAO inhibitor. A dangerous drug interaction could occur. MAO inhibitors include isocarboxazid, linezolid, phenelzine, rasagiline, selegiline, and tranylcypromine.

To make sure Zoloft is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have ever had:

heart disease, high blood pressure, or a stroke;

liver or kidney disease;

a seizure;

bleeding problems, or if you take warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven);

bipolar disorder (manic depression); or

low levels of sodium in your blood.

Some medicines can interact with sertraline and cause a serious condition called serotonin syndrome. Be sure your doctor knows if you also take stimulant medicine, opioid medicine, herbal products, other antidepressants, or medicine for mental illness, Parkinson’s disease, migraine headaches, serious infections, or prevention of nausea and vomiting. Ask your doctor before making any changes in how or when you take your medications.

Some young people have thoughts about suicide when first taking an antidepressant. Your doctor should check your progress at regular visits. Your family or other caregivers should also be alert to changes in your mood or symptoms.

Source: Youtube