The Occipital Lobe anatomy, function and injury from neurofeedback perspectives



The occipital lobe is located at the back portion of the brain and is associated with interpreting visual stimuli and information. The primary visual cortex, which receives and interprets information from the retinas of the eyes, is located in the occipital lobe.

The primary visual cortex is located on the posterior part of the occipital lobe and receives visual information from the retinas. It provides macular vision (vision in which each eye is used separately). By using the eyes in this way, as opposed to binocular vision, the field of view is increased, while depth perception is limited.

The lesion causes homonymous hemianopsia (partial blindness resulting in a loss of vision in the same visual field of both eyes).

The visual association area is located surrounds the primary visual cortex and interprets visual stimuli (e.g., color, form, and movement).

Parastriate cortex Peristriate cortex is receiving visual info bilaterally and complex processing for color, movement, direction, visual interpretation.

The lesion can cause visual agnosia (is a loss of ability to recognize objects, persons, sounds, shapes, or smells while the specific sense is not defective nor is there any significant memory loss.
Damage to the occipital lobe can cause visual problems such as difficulty recognizing objects, an inability to identify colors, and trouble recognizing words.

Traumatic memories that accompany visual flashbacks are processed in the occipital lobes.

OCCIPITAL LOBE NEUROFEEDBACK APPLICATION
Neurofeedback training in O2 helps to maintain performance such as counting and auditory discrimination, increasing the quality of musical performance.
Depression and anxiety have also been shown to remit after deep‐state neurofeedback training in Oz and O1.
Visual memories, accurate reading, and traumatic memories accompanying visual flashbacks are usually processed in the occipital lobes, O1, O2, and Oz.
Patients suffering from PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder) may benefit from neurofeedback training in the occipital lobes, particularly when doing deep state training.

For more information: https://biofeedback-neurofeedback-therapy.com/brain-regions-function-in-neurofeedback/

Source: Youtube